We’re hard at work on our next season but, while you’re waiting, we wanted to share Carbon Valley, another podcast from Wyoming Public Media that follows the race to develop an unlikely climate solution.

 

Interested in this story from The Modern West? Be sure to subscribe wherever you get your podcasts so you never miss an episode.

 

Former Gov. Matt Mead, middle, at the 2016 groundbreaking ceremony for the Integrated Test Center. Wyoming legislators allocated $15 million of state funds alongside $6 million from the private industry for its construction. "A glimmer of hope came for the state’s beleaguered coal industry this week," read a press release.

 

In Gillette, Wyoming, the self-declared energy capital of the nation since the 1960s, a community faces another chaotic coal bankruptcy, leaving miners without jobs and, for many, a question of whether to stick around. It’s the latest chapter of a well-known story: the decline of coal.

With a fundamental economic piece on the rocks, state leaders are forced to find answers to solve both a community’s problems and their own. For now, over a decade, leaders have increasingly invested time and energy into an answer to the “what’s next” question: becoming a hub for a thing called carbon capture. One of the first moves to jumpstart the nascent industry: host an international carbon capture competition. In Part 1 of this story, we also meet our main character.

Image: Former Gov. Matt Mead, middle, at the 2016 groundbreaking ceremony for the Integrated Test Center. Wyoming legislators allocated $15 million of state funds alongside $6 million from the private industry for its construction. “A glimmer of hope came for the state’s beleaguered coal industry this week,” read a press release.

 

Music
Theme music by Mark Guiliana
Blue Dot Sessions
Ketsa
Kelpe
Vaguess
Storyblocks

Produced with support from the Society of Environmental Journalists